Skip to main content
Image of "Rivers Monument" art piece at YVR
  • The Rivers Monument
    Year: 2015
    Artist: Marianne Nicolson
    Dimensions and materials: Glass, stainless steel, red cedar and acrylic paint | 8.57 m tall; glass column tapes from 1.42 m at the bottom to 1 m at the top
    Terminal: Domestic
    Level: Level 3
    Security access: After security

    These two innovative glass-etched poles are a monument to the Columbia River and Fraser River, which carried a wealth of ancient names from the Indigenous Nations that fished and managed them. Each pole is a cut through of the river system, with the top of the column representing the surface and the bottom the riverbed. Each pole portrays a different history, with pictograph-like images of humans, fish, wildlife and water. Perched atop both poles are carved and painted red cedar eagles acting as witnesses.
Image of Raven Stealing the Beaver Lake art by Reg Davidson
  • Raven Stealing the Beaver Lake

    Year: 2016
    Artist: Reg Davidson
    Dimensions and materials: Cedar | 24-foot cedar pole
    Terminal: Domestic
    Level: Level 3
    Security access: After security

    Raven Stealing the Beaver Lake is a 24-foot carved cedar pole that illustrates an episode of Haida creation myth in which the Beaver people brought Raven to their great house and provided him with meals of salmon. Nearby are The Blind Halibut Fisherman and Raven with a Broken Break sculptures, as well as a large bentwood box traditionally used to store ceremonial regalia and other precious objects.

Image of "Freedom to Move" art piece at YVR
  • Freedom to Move
    Year: 2009
    Artist: Steve Smith
    Dimensions and materials: laminated red cedar, acrylic paint | 6.3 x 1.4 x 3.25 m overall
    Terminal: Domestic
    Level: Level 3
    Security access: After security

    Set on a black granite platform above a pool of water, this work encourages travellers to slow down and contemplate. Composed of six large, laminated red cedar panels, the work is filled with stylistic innovations, yet still alludes to Northwest Coast beliefs and graphic design conventions. The panels represent a host of crest and story creatures in a state of transformation, with their vertical orientation suggesting they are rising up out of dark water--emerging from a time and place of creation.
Image of "Sky to Sky" art piece at YVR
  • Sky to Sky
    Year: 2011
    Artist: Steve Smith
    Dimensions and materials: Mahogany plywood, medium-density fireboard, acrylic paint | 91 cm in diametre
    Terminal: Domestic
    Level: Level 3
    Security access: After security

    This installation acknowledges the ceremonial use of drums in First Nations culture. The pieces silently drum the arrival and departure of travellers at YVR, honouring the tradition of drumming for arriving and departing guests at an event. They reference YVR's theme of land sea and sky with creatures from all three realms. The lower drums contain animals of the sea, followed by land creatures such as the Bear and creatures of the sky at the top.
Image of "Snuw'uy'ulth" art pieces at YVR
  • Snuw'uy'ulth

    Year: 2009
    Artist: John Marston
    Dimensions and materials: Yellow cedar, acrylic paint, glass, cedar bark rope, abalone shell, operculum | 187.76 x 22.89 cm each, with the exception of the steersman paddle at 213.4 x 22.86 cm
    Terminal: Domestic
    Level: Level 3
    Security access: After security

    Coast Salish artist John Marston's installation is a metaphor of travel and the sea. The work alludes to the immense importance of the dugout cedar canoe to the indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast, for whom it was the principal means of transportation for thousands of years. The paddles symbolize the canoe's protective spirit and represent "snuw'uy'ulth," meaning "the teaching of our nation." They are deeply carved and richly painted with stories of the Chemainus First Nation, with each portraying a different animal of importance to the culture.

Image of "Raven House" art piece at YVR
  • Raven House Posts
    Year: 1990
    Artist: Roy Henry Vickers
    Dimensions and materials: Painted red cedar | 3.3 x 0.9 x 1.5 m
    Terminal: Domestic
    Level: Level 3
    Security access: After security

    Created as part of a series of work representing YVR’s theme of Land, Sea and Sky, this installation focuses on Raven, a cultural hero in the ancient legends of Northwest Coast people. He is a revered and benevolent transformer figure who helps people shape the world, putting the sun in the sky, the fish in the sea and the food on the land.